Issue #5 - September 2011: Page 1 / Page 2

Previous Issues




In this issue:
FASHION: Mono. Lisa / INTERVIEW: 6 Objects of Desire - Tim Groen / FASHION: Paper Kisses / FASHION: Element Eden & Mono. / FASHION: AW2011 - Illustrated / DESIGN: The Lumiere, Tai Pei / ILLUSTRATED: Porno-in-Space / FASHION: Kermit Tesoro / ART: John Russell / ART: Inversion - James Bacchi-Andreoli / FASHION: Seasonal Rushes - Ebru Ercon / FOUND: An Archeology of Brick Lane - Imran Perretta





FASHION: Mono. Lisa

Mono.Sept2011-Fashion-Mono.Lisa.Slide1 Mono.Sept2011-Fashion-Mono.Lisa.Slide 2 Mono.Sept2011-Fashion-Mono.Lisa.Slide 3 Mono.Sept2011-Fashion-Mono.Lisa.Slide 4

Photographer Mikolai Berg & stylist Lyson Marchessault collaborate to create this monocromatic vision of Autumn/Winter 2011/12 exclusively for Mono.

Channelling early 1990s editorial & a hard-edged sophisitication is the order of the day. Graphic shapes & static poses combined with masculine, oversized talioring creates something sharp yet without severity.

 

Photographer: Mikolai Berg
Stylist: Lyson Marchessault
Hair: Anna Cofone
Make up: Veronica Martinez
Set design: Juliet Murrel

Model: Lisa V at Premier

Photography assistant: Craig Teunissen
Thanks to ProVision and ProLighting

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INTERVIEW: 6 Objects of Desire / Tim Groen

TimGroen-6ObjectsofDesire-NatvieFunkandFlash-Slide1 TimGroen-6ObjectsofDesire-Avedon-Slide2 TimGroen-6ObjectsofDesire-Fiorucci-Slide3 TimGroen-6ObjectsofDesire-Broodthaers-Slide4 TimGroen-6ObjectsofDesire-StevenMeisel-Slide5.jpg TimGroen-6ObjectsofDesire-RockDreams-Slide6

Illustrator, photographer, writer, art director... New York based Tim Groen is a non-stop creative force. His personal & approachable approach is infectious, his genuine love of people infuses all of his work. Tim's 6 Objects of Desire is a crystal clear insight into what makes this man tick.

The Object of Desire I'm about to pull the trigger on: Native Funk & Flash: An Emerging Folk Art By Alexandra Jacopetti, 1974
I'm a Gemini, so sometimes making a simple purchase takes a couple of years, fellow Gemini will know what I'm talking about. I think I'm ready now. Native Funk & Flash is a little paperback from 1974.
With photographer Jerry Wainwright, Jacopetti introduces us to a California scene of crafty, creative freaks — including a serving of Cockettes — who crochet, patchwork, knit, bead & embroider like their lives depend on it. The attractive, colorful portraits, accompanied by short blurbs, make you want to go back in time & get high with a fringed Victorian piano shawl tied around your head, or waist, or leg. It all works, as the images demonstrate. Good interior decoration inspiration, too; I suspect a Victorian revival is just around the corner.

Precious Object of Desire: Avedon, Photographs 1947- 1977 Designed by Elizabeth Paul, 1978
Nothing equals book browsing in an actual brick-&-mortar vintage bookstore. I'm fortunate enough, or should I say unfortunate, to live near Clic, the bookstore & gallery founded by designer Christiane Celle. In this treasure trove of fashion photography-related first editions & signed copies, I found an Avedon book I never actually held before & you guessed right: a signed first edition.
The scale, the iconic 1953 portrait of Marella Agnelli on the cover, the brittle, yellowed acetate dust jacket with the dramatic red signature, the thick, uncoated pages & the barely-there interior graphic design all make this a Book/Object of the first order. Please save me from myself & buy it before I decide to. It's worth the $750 it is listed at. Clic Gallery & Bookstore: www.clicgallery.com

The Elusive Object of Desire: Fiorucci, The Book By Eve Babitz, 1980
Occasionally I see copies floating by on abebooks.com or Amazon, but, I want to physically flip through 'Fiorucci, The Boo'k before I shell out four hundred bucks.
Apparently it contains all the imagery Fiorucci created for its collateral materials; the posters, ashtrays, tin cans, hang tags, POP displays, packaging. Does that sound orgasmic or what? The more I've been thinking about the Fiorucci graphics, the more I realize that my appreciation is not just rooted in nostalgia. The DNA of their identity went back to British Pop art & to Eduardo Paolozzi in particular. Kitsch? Sure, that too. But because there was more to it, we are still intrigued by the brand's heyday. Now where's that book already?

Soon-to-be-released Object of Desire: Marcel Broodthaers: Works & Collected Writings Edited by Gloria Moure. Text by Birgit Pelzer Release date November/December 2011
While I'm obviously fond of out of print books, anticipating upcoming volumes can be no less exciting -having them at home is just a little more exciting, of course.
Spanish publisher Ediciones Poligrafa will soon be releasing a 400+ page tome about the late, great visionary Marcel Broodthaers, which includes not only tons of visuals, but poetry, interviews, open letters and other previously unpublished writings as well. This is a no-brainer; in the shopping cart it goes.

 

The I'm-waiting-for-it Object of Desire: Steven Meisel, The Editorials By Unknown, publishing date non-existent
This would be a three-volume boxed set of cloth bound books. A catalogue raisonné, director's cut-style, of Steven Meisel's editorial work thus far, including the shots rejected by editors. Why this does not exist I don't know.
These are the things I think about: how does a Tom Ford have a book & a Steven Meisel does not? It could be because Meisel is a perfectionist & he doesn't see the need for a vanity project. Which I would not only understand, but even admire. That said, I would love to pour over every amazing shoot he has ever done. I can't think of any contemporary, commercial photographer who continually creates flawless, flawless work, & we're talking decades at this point. It's not that its all my style necessarily, but with so much mediocrity around us all day long, there is something mesmerizing about Meisel's level of skill alone.

Object of Desire I actually own: Rock Dreams By Guy Peellaert & Nick Cohn, 1973
Once upon a time, when Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll were still organically connected, an illustrator & a rock writer got together & created Rock Dreams. My parents had this book when I was little & I vividly remember being confused & fascinated by it.
It's a weird, dark collection of airbrushed, illustrated portraits of rock stars by the Belgian Nick Peeleart — who also did covers for Bowie & the Stones. Everybody from the Mamas & the Papas to Johnny Cash to Donovan, gets a trippy, pervy treatment. You never quite know what you're looking at, because there's always something off in terms of context. Each image is accompanied by an oblique caption, sometimes a fragment of a lyric, by rock writer Cohn.
I'm from hippie stock, so I wasn't considered too young for anything as a kid; Tina fellating a microphone, Jethro Tull indecently proposing a five-year old, the Stones in Nazi regalia with naked children, it's all in there & then some.
This book still is a huge source of inspiration to me.

TimGroen.com

Illustration: Tim Groen

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FASHION: Paper Kisses

Mono. Issue #5 Spetember 2011 - Fashion - Paper Kisses Slide 1 Mono. Issue #5 Spetember 2011 - Fashion - Paper Kisses Slide 2 Mono. Issue #5 Spetember 2011 - Fashion - Paper Kisses Slide 3 Mono. Issue #5 Spetember 2011 - Fashion - Paper Kisses Slide 4 Mono. Issue #5 Spetember 2011 - Fashion - Paper Kisses Slide 5 Mono. Issue #5 Spetember 2011 - Fashion - Paper Kisses Slide 6

Photographer, Lena Modigh perfectly captures a fleeting moment: a beautiful girl at the end of Summer, the Summer of her youth...

Paper Kisses is a diary of youth with the pages put up for all the world to see.

 

Photographer: Lena Modigh
Stylist: Tereza Ortiz
Hair & make up: Therese Svenbo at Agent Bauer

Model: Linnea at Stockholmsgruppen

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FASHION: Element Eden & Mono.

Mono. Issue #5 FASHION: Element Eden & Mono. Slide 1 Mono. Issue #5 FASHION: Element Eden & Mono. Slide 2 Mono. Issue #5 FASHION: Element Eden & Mono. Slide 3 Mono. Issue #5 FASHION: Element Eden & Mono. Slide 4 Mono. Issue #5 FASHION: Element Eden & Mono. Slide 5

As inevitably Summer draws to a close, thoughts turn to warmth & comfort.

With roots in skateboarding, Element Eden draws on the late 40s & 50s to create a range of womean's coats that are both classic & modern. Cocoon shapes, boyish jackets & tailored shapes have been crafted to withstand the harshness of nature.

Based in Southern California, Element Eden is now one of the world's leading women's youth lifestyle brands.

ElementEden.eu/coats

 

Words & Images: Matt Ryalls

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FASHION: A/W 2011 Illustrated

Mono. Issue #5 September 2011 - FASHION: Autumn Winter 2011 illustrated by Lucie Russell - Prada Mono. Issue #5 September 2011 - FASHION: Autumn Winter 2011 illustrated by Lucie Russell - Givenchy Mono. Issue #5 September 2011 - FASHION: Autumn Winter 2011 illustrated by Lucie Russell - David Koma Mono. Issue #5 September 2011 - FASHION: Autumn Winter 2011 illustrated by Lucie Russell - Comme des Garcons Mono. Issue #5 September 2011 - FASHION: Autumn Winter 2011 illustrated by Lucie Russell - Fendi Mono. Issue #5 September 2011 - FASHION: Autumn Winter 2011 illustrated by Lucie Russell - Lanvin Mono. Issue #5 September 2011 - FASHION: Autumn Winter 2011 illustrated by Lucie Russell - Louis Vuitton Mono. Issue #5 September 2011 - FASHION: Autumn Winter 2011 illustrated by Lucie Russell - Gucci Mono. Issue #5 September 2011 - FASHION: Autumn Winter 2011 illustrated by Lucie Russell - Marc Jacobs

Some of our favourite Autumn/Winter 2011 collections, beautifully illustrated by Lucie Russell.

Form & print feature strongly, accompanied by the all important accessories. The hat make definitive statement about the 1950s & the 1970s. Those knee-high Louis Vuitton rubber boots are going to be haunting us for the next couple of months...

 

Images: Lucie Russell

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DESIGN: Made In Tawiwan - The Lumiere, Taipei

Mono. Issue #5 September 2011 - DESIGN: The Lumiere, Taipei - slide 1 Mono. Issue #5 September 2011 - DESIGN: The Lumiere, Taipei - slide 2 Mono. Issue #5 September 2011 - DESIGN: The Lumiere, Taipei - slide 3 Mono. Issue #5 September 2011 - DESIGN: The Lumiere, Taipei - slide 4

Architect Calvin Tsao's new project in Taipei artfully marries globalism with localism.

Luxury residential developments aren't generally renowned for their innovative interior architecture. Most offer an anodyne approximation of what is perceived to be 'good' taste – sleek beige boxes with little personality or thought for their location. For commercially-minded developers, the rationale for building glass & steel behemoths in desirable global hot-spots is obvious. When you're aiming to attract high net worth individuals who often have little connection to the neighbourhood they are buying into, it pays to play it safe.

Renowned Chinese-American architect Calvin Tsao was commissioned to design Asian developers Pheonix Property Investors' (PPI) latest development, The Lumiere - a nine apartment development in Tien Mu, Taiwan. The resulting building artfully balances globalism with localism – think contemporary architecture married with traditional materials and modern interiors embellished with works by local artisans. Tsao talks about his inspirations & influences:

You've worked in Taipei before. How did the city inform your design for the Lumiere?
Calvin Tsao: It's situated in a neighbourhood called Tienmu, which has an interesting vibe that's slightly European & slightly Japanese, but neither of those two exactly. I find that people in Taiwan are very individualist - they're avid readers & freethinkers. It's the closest thing in Asia of 'slow living' & the 'slow movement.' Here, there is an ease in life - they like to enjoy the moment. You feel it on the street, the smaller cafes, the funny bookstores & the little gestures that they pay a lot of attention to.

How did that affect the decisions you made?
CT: One of the virtues of this project is that it doesn't suffer the anonymity of a huge development – it was about creating a very intimate community of nine families. An interesting thing about Chinese families & Chinese social constructs, is that you have the 'hutong' & you have the courtyard houses, where many generations, many branches of the same family live under one roof. So we're looking at the Chinese cultural imprint & its relationship with the civic & the private. I wasn't looking at Western models, in that sense, even though this building is, of course, a contemporary international-style building.

So it's quite different to building a tower in lower Manhattan…
CT: The whole relationship of attraction & retraction of communal relationships &private moments is totally different. We're using classic Chinese models of that relationship & interjecting it into a contemporary context. I've tried to create a sense of intimacy & dignity.

 

You used a lot of local artists & local craftspeople for the art & the furniture.
CT: Yes, This is something we've always looked for, when we can. We need to be grounded, to understand what we have, be grateful for what we have. Be respectful & grateful, that we have wonderful things right in your backyard. So it's a good reminder that there are talents here in Taiwan too.

You've been working in cities around the world for more than two decades. Can you talk about cities & urbanism going forward & what's changed over your career?
CT: I love the energy of urban life, but the world cannot just be made of mega-cities. Cities have to be broken down into smaller, digestible bites, as in neighbourhoods. In New York, we really should appreciate what we have, because we are in a big city that has developed into small villages over time & actually it's a group of smaller villages becoming a big city. New, modern cities today, which are all engineered overnight, they don't have these kinds of distinctions, which are a real problem.

So now, in China, we're working on agricultural communities, as well as nodal communities that are satellites around bigger cities. Of course you have to integrate technology into these communities, but it cannot be the driver, it is just a piece of detail.

Words: Saiqa Ajmal

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Next Page»

ILLUSTRATED: Porno-in-Space / FASHION: Kermit Tesoro / ART: John Russell / ART: Inversion - James Bacchi-Andreoli / FASHION: Seasonal Rushes - Ebru Ercon /
FOUND: An Archeology of Brick Lane - Imran Perretta